Yesterday morning, the Official Google Blog released a response to public outcry over their deal with Verizon, which proposes legislation for lawmakers to created a tiered internet in which companies could pay for their content to load faster than others, for example, Google’s YouTube could pay to be on the higher tier, allowing its content to be served faster than other sites who cannot afford to strike a similar deal and have their content served on the higher tier.

Google’s response comes in the form of a series of myths vs. facts. Here is a brief summary:

MYTH: Google has “sold out” on network neutrality.
FACT: “We’re not saying this solution is perfect, but we believe that a proposal that locks in key enforceable protections for consumers is preferable to no protection at all.”

MYTH: This proposal represents a step backwards for the open Internet.
FACT: “If adopted, this proposal would for the first time give the FCC the ability to preserve the open Internet through enforceable rules on broadband providers. At the same time, the FCC would be prohibited from imposing regulations on the Internet itself.”

MYTH: This proposal would eliminate network neutrality over wireless.
FACT: “In our proposal, we agreed that the best first step is for wireless providers to be fully transparent with users about how network traffic is managed to avoid congestion, or prioritized for certain applications and content.”

MYTH: This proposal will allow broadband providers to “cannibalize” the public Internet.
FACT: “Another aspect of the joint proposal would allow broadband providers to offer certain specialized services to customers, services which are not part of the Internet. So, for example, broadband providers could offer a special gaming channel, or a more secure banking service, or a home health monitoring capability – so long as such offerings are separate and apart from the public Internet.”

MYTH: Google is working with Verizon on this because of Android.
FACT: “This is a policy proposal – not a business deal.”

MYTH: Two corporations legislating the future of the Internet.
FACT: “Our two companies are proposing a legislative framework to the Congress for its consideration. […] We’re simply trying to offer a proposal to help resolve a debate which has largely stagnated after five years.”

MYTH: Google has “sold out” on network neutrality.
FACT: “We’re not saying this solution is perfect, but we believe that a proposal that locks in key enforceable protections for consumers is preferable to no protection at all.”

MYTH: This proposal represents a step backwards for the open Internet.
FACT: “If adopted, this proposal would for the first time give the FCC the ability to preserve the open Internet through enforceable rules on broadband providers. At the same time, the FCC would be prohibited from imposing regulations on the Internet itself.”

MYTH: This proposal would eliminate network neutrality over wireless.
FACT: “In our proposal, we agreed that the best first step is for wireless providers to be fully transparent with users about how network traffic is managed to avoid congestion, or prioritized for certain applications and content.”

MYTH: This proposal will allow broadband providers to “cannibalize” the public Internet.
FACT: “Another aspect of the joint proposal would allow broadband providers to offer certain specialized services to customers, services which are not part of the Internet. So, for example, broadband providers could offer a special gaming channel, or a more secure banking service, or a home health monitoring capability – so long as such offerings are separate and apart from the public Internet.”

MYTH: Google is working with Verizon on this because of Android.
FACT: “This is a policy proposal – not a business deal.”

MYTH: Two corporations legislating the future of the Internet.
FACT: “Our two companies are proposing a legislative framework to the Congress for its consideration. […] We’re simply trying to offer a proposal to help resolve a debate which has largely stagnated after five years.”

Link via Ars Technica